Georgia Prenuptial Agreement FAQ

What is a prenuptial agreement?
A prenuptial agreement is a contract entered into by two people who are to be married. The purpose of a Prenuptial Agreement is to set forth certain rights for each party in the event of a divorce. Sometimes provisions for property distribution upon death are included, but such provisions are better placed in a Last Will and Testament.

Why do people get prenuptial agreements?
The most common reason for a Prenuptial Agreement is to protect property that one or both parties owned before the marriage from becoming divided upon divorce.

What is an "antenuptial agreement" or a "premarital agreement"?
These are all synonyms for a Prenuptial Agreement. They all refer to the same concept, the same type of document.

Can I sign a prenuptial or post-nuptial agreement after I get married?
Yes. It would be called a "Post-Nuptial Agreement" and Georgia law does currently recognize such documents.

Does everyone getting married need a Prenuptial Agreement?
Prenuptial agreements are not for everyone. Prenuptial Agreements are generally utilized by parties who have considerable assets prior to the marriage and want to keep those assets separate or those who have been through a divorce and want to minimize the cost and time if they unfortunately go through another divorce. Without a prenuptial agreement, it is possible in certain circumstances for separate or premarital property to lose its separate quality and it can then become marital property or can be used to pay alimony.

Can a Prenuptial Agreement cover alimony?
Sometimes, Prenuptial Agreements are used to limit, establish or eliminate alimony in the event of a divorce.

Can a Prenuptial Agreement affect child custody or child support?
Generally speaking, Prenuptial Agreements do not deal with child custody or child support. Judges make the final decision on custody, and parties cannot pre-determine child support because the law regards child support as being a right for a child, and parties cannot override that right. Custody also must be determined AT THE TIME OF THE DISPUTE since no one can predict all the circumstances which will exist at the time of a custody dispute.

I already have a house and property and I want to protect it. Will a Prenuptial Agreement help?
Yes. If you own property before the marriage and you want to protect that property in the event of divorce, a well drafted and enforceable Prenuptial Agreement can make it easier for you to keep that property in the event of a divorce.

Do I need my own lawyer if my fiancé’s attorney prepared a Prenuptial Agreement?
Yes. It is important to have your own counsel explain fully the proposed Agreement and the potential pitfalls that could affect you in the event of a divorce. Your attorney can suggest changes to the proposed Agreement that can dramatically affect to your benefit what happens in the event of a divorce.

Does my fiancé need their own lawyer if my attorney prepares a Prenuptial Agreement?
Yes. Not only does it make it more fair (each side has independent advice), it also makes it more enforceable since neither can later argue that they did not understand what they were signing.

Even if my spouse and I have a Prenuptial Agreement, can we change the terms later?
Yes. You can "re-up the Prenup" by having your attorney prepare an addendum to the original Agreement. After that has been properly signed and witnessed, it becomes a part of the original Agreement and will reflect the new terms you have changed.

What if my spouse and I decide, after years of marriage, that we no longer want to have the Prenuptial Agreement in effect?
Most well-written Prenuptial Agreements will contain a provision that dictates exactly how to cancel the Prenuptial Agreement so that it is no longer in effect. Further, your attorney can build in Asunset@ provisions to the original Prenuptial Agreement that provide for its automatic cancellation after an agreed-upon amount of years.

Will a Prenuptial Agreement determine how my spouse’s property is distributed after his/her death?
Not unless you insist on such a provision. It is strongly recommended that you each have a Last Will and Testament to cover what happens to property upon the death of a spouse. Generally, a good Prenuptial Agreement will contain language that says that either of you are free to give or will away any property you want to the other party.

Are Prenuptial Agreements expensive?
As is in most cases, the cost is based on how long it takes your attorney to prepare the Agreement. Prenuptial Agreements take a lot of time to prepare since they are an attempt to resolve disputes which have not yet occurred and which are based upon factors which do not yet exist (changes in income, assets, the birth of children, etc.) In some limited cases, Prenuptial Agreements can be prepared on a flat fee basis. See your attorney for more complete fee and cost information.

SOURCE: DivorceNet

SOURCE FOR POST: Georgia Family Law Blog

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT PATERNITY

WHAT IS PATERNITY?

Paternity means fatherhood, the quality or state of being a father.


WHAT IS A PATERNITY TEST?

A Paternity Test is a DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) or genetic test that determines whether a given man could be the biological father of a child.


ON WHAT GROUNDS CAN I RECEIVE A PATERNITY TEST?

Paternity test are not just used to determine whether an individual is the biological father of a child. A Paternity test is useful in many situations, including:

  • Assisting women seeking child support from a man who denies he is a child s biological father.
  • Helping men attempting to win custody or visitation rights.
  • Providing peace of mind for men wishing to confirm paternity.
  • Establishing proof of heritage for an adopted child seeking their biological parents.
  • Determining grand parentage, inheritance rights, insurance claims or Social Security benefits.
  • Assisting in immigration cases on the grounds an individual is a biological relative of a citizen.
  • Establishing Native American Tribal Rights.
  • Determining rightful heirs by DNA profiling for estate purpose.
  • Providing conclusive evidence of sisterhood or brotherhood for siblings separated for long periods of time.

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Premarital Agreements FAQ’s

1) WHAT IS A PRE-MARITAL AGREEMENT?
A pre-marital agreement may be entered into by competent adults who are legally able to marry. The purpose of such an agreement is to avoid the usual legal consequences of joining the estates of two parties by marriage. Many people have an established estate, and/or established responsibilities to prior family, which they would like to see protected from the new spouse and new obligations. This can only be done by the consent of both parties to the marriage, and with full knowledge of each other’s financial situation.

2) WILL IT HOLD UP IN COURT?
It is important to understand that the enforceability of the agreement is the most important concern, and sometimes compromises must be made to ensure enforceability. An agreement that was made without full disclosure, or entered into without proper legal advice, or under duress, will probably not hold up in court. You must be aware that such a document will almost always be scrutinized by a court at the time it is enforced to determine if it was fair at the time it was signed, whether the parties understood what they were signing, and had proper legal advice.

3) WHEN SHOULD YOU MAKE A PRE-MARITAL AGREEMENT?
To avoid the appearance of duress, the agreement should be done as far in advance of the wedding date as possible, and before expensive preparations are made. Both sides should have independent legal counsel to advise them. Remember, this is basically a divorce settlement entered into before marriage, and, if done properly, could serve as the basis of an uncontested divorce if the marriage ends, thus avoiding a costly legal battle over these issues.

4) CAN A MARITAL AGREEMENT BE DONE AFTER THE WEDDING?
A Marital Agreement can be made after the wedding whenever differences arise between the parties regarding the future financial issues. The Agreement must be based upon some consideration other than the marriage itself. Sometimes such an Agreement is made as part of a reconciliation of the parties or following some other dispute. Such an Agreement has been held to be just as enforceable as a Premarital Agreement.

SOURCE: DivorceNet

Alimony/Spousal Support

Spousal support is the right of one spouse to receive an award of money from the other spouse, on a temporary or permanent basis, whenever a court determines that the facts of that particular situation warrant it. In Georgia, the statutes and the courts refer to such spousal support as alimony. No one is entitled to alimony by virtue of marriage alone. The court may grant alimony to either spouse from the income or estate of the other, either as periodic payments or lump sum awards. It may end at the death or remarriage of the recipient, or it may end sooner by the specific terms of the Final Decree or Judgment. Alimony may also be awarded on a temporary basis during the pendency of the divorce action.

There are no guidelines for determining alimony, but it is based upon the determination of the trier of fact of the needs of one party and the ability to pay of the other party. Some of the factors that the court may consider in determining first if alimony is appropriate, and then in what amount, are as follows:

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Child Custody FAQ

What factors do courts take into account when deciding who gets custody of the children?

Almost all courts use a standard that gives the "best interests of the child" the highest priority when deciding custody issues. What the best interests of a child are in a given situation depends on many factors, including:

  • the child’s age, sex, and mental and physical health
  • the parent’s mental and physical health
  • the parent’s lifestyle and other social factors, including whether the child is exposed to second-hand smoke and whether there is any history of child abuse
  • the emotional bond between parent and child, as well as the parent’s ability to give the child guidance
  • the parent’s ability to provide the child with food, shelter, clothing, and medical care
  • the child’s established living pattern (school, home, community, religious institution)
  • the quality of the child’s education in the current situation
  • the impact on the child of changing the status quo, and 
  • the child’s preference, if the child is above a certain age (usually about 12).

Assuming that none of these factors clearly favors one parent over the other, most courts tend to focus on which parent is likely to provide the children a stable environment, and which parent will better foster the child’s relationship with the other parent. With younger children, this may mean awarding custody to the parent who has been the child’s primary caregiver. With older children, this may mean giving custody to the parent who is best able to foster continuity in education, neighborhood life, religious institutions, and peer relationships.

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