Do You Need a Cobb County Probate Attorney?

Do You Need a Cobb County Probate Attorney?

Maze of probate

 

In the state of Georgia, it’s not legally required for you to hire a probate lawyer after the passing of a loved one, but that doesn’t mean it’s not a good idea.  For one thing, a Cobb County probate attorney will have a lot of insight into the process, which is something most folks just don’t have.  After all, the probate lawyer works with probate cases all the time, is up-to-date on the most current laws, and has a pretty good idea of how to streamline the process as much as possible.

Hiring a Marietta probate lawyer is a good idea for another reason, too:  If you do something wrong in the proceedings, the liability is on you.  Considering all the complicated paperwork, financial responsibilities and time-sensitive deadlines, a lot of folks just don’t want to take on that kind of responsibility.  Additionally, the person in charge of an estate (the Executor) is often dealing with his or her own grief and doesn’t want the additional stress of the job.

That said, plenty of estates can go through probate without a lawyer.  If all of the decedent’s assets can be transferred outside of probate, then a probate lawyer wouldn’t be necessary.  Cases like that might include assets that are held in joint tenancy, or those that have a named beneficiary, such as an insurance policy or retirement account.

It’s up to the individual in charge to determine if or when professional advice is needed.  Some circumstances where this might happen could include:

  • Family members threatening to contest a will
  • Business dealings that weren’t complete when the decedent passed away
  • The need for a guardian for a minor or disabled adult
  • A shortfall of assets to cover debts owed by the estate
  • There are complications with the taxes
  • Assets were not properly owned by an existing trust

If the situation isn’t overly complex, you may only need the Marietta probate attorney to consult with you or review a few documents.  A couple of hours of the attorney’s time might be all you need to ensure that you’ve got everything in proper order.  On the other hand, if things start looking particularly complicated, it’s a good idea to gather up all your materials and sit down with an experienced probate lawyer in Cobb County for your own protection and your family’s peace of mind.

 If you’d like to give your loved ones and yourself the gift of peace of mind, please call Steve at 770-425-6060 or email him at steve@georgiaestateplan.com.

For additional information on filing probate in Georgia, click here for Seven Steps to Handling Your Loved One’s Estate.

About Probate Courts in Georgia

About Probate Courts in Georgia

gavel will

Probate Courts in Georgia are courts of limited but exclusive jurisdiction over (a) the probate of wills and the administration of estates of deceased persons, (b) the appointment of guardians of the person and property of incapacitated adults, (c) the appointment of guardians of the property of minors, (d) the appointment, in certain circumstances, of guardians of the person of minors, and (e) the commitment for involuntary treatment of persons addicted to drugs or alcohol and/or suffering from mental illness. Probate Courts also issue certain licenses and permits and perform certain administrative duties. In many counties, the Probate Court exercises limited criminal jurisdiction (traffic cases, game and fish violations, etc.) Some Probate Judges also serve as the Elections Superintendent and/or Vital Records Custodian for their counties. In certain counties, the Probate Judge is also the Magistrate Court Judge.

The Probate Court of Cobb County is an “Article 6 Probate Court” [Title 15, Chapter 9, Article 6, Official Code of Georgia Annotated] and has an enhanced or expanded jurisdiction. Under Article 6, which applies in counties having a population of 96,000 or more, the Probate Judge must be a licensed attorney with experience and qualifications equal to those for serving in the Superior Courts of Georgia. Article 6 Probate Courts have certain concurrent jurisdiction with the Superior Courts and may conduct jury trials in issues properly before the court. Appeals from Article 6 Probate Courts are directly to the Court of Appeals or the Supreme Court, as appropriate.

Many of the procedures filed in the Probate Courts in Georgia are by use of the Georgia Probate Court Standard Forms. Not all proceedings have a standard form applicable to them. All Georgia Probate Court Standard Forms are available in each Probate Court. These forms are also available at, may be downloaded from, and may be compiled on the Georgia Probate Court On-Line System.

Information about metro Atlanta probate courts:

Probate Court of Cherokee County

Judge B. Keith Wood
90 North Street
Suite 340
Canton,  GA   30114
Phone: 678 -493- 6160
Fax:  678-493-6170
View Website

Probate court of Cobb County

Kelli Wolk, Chief Judge
32 Waddell Street
Marietta, GA 30090
(770) 528-1900
(770) 528-1996 fax
View Web site

Clerk of Court (770) 528-1900
Estates Division (770) 528-1900
Firearms License ( 770) 528-1922
Marriage License (770) 528-1921

Probate Court of Fulton County

Judge Pinkie Toomer,
T2705 Justice Center Tower
185 Central Avenue, SW
Atlanta,  GA   30303
Phone:  404 -612- 4640
Fax:  404-730-7998

View Website