Prenuptial Agreements as a Part of Newlywed Planning in Atlanta | Prenuptial Agreements - General
Prenuptial Agreements as a Part of Newlywed Planning in Atlanta

Prenuptial Agreements as a Part of Newlywed Planning in Atlanta

Atlanta prenuptial agreements lawyer

 

There are few times in life that are as exciting and full of promise as the period of wedding and newlywed planning.  People know that their wedding day will be one of the most remembered of their lives.  While there is certainly stress involved in making so many decisions, there is also an underlying sense of fun.

Unfortunately, there are some aspects of newlywed planning that are not quite as enjoyable as others.  Still, paying attention to things like estate planning and prenuptial agreements help to set up the marriage in a healthy way.  Some people will argue against that notion, but marriage lawyers in Atlanta GA have seen the benefits of this kind of preparation.

The prenup itself is a legal contract between the two parties who plan to be married.  Just what is covered in the document will depend on you and your future spouse and your circumstances.  For example, if this is your first marriage and there are no children involved, your needs will be different than for couples whose marriages will be blending families with stepchildren.

The idea of a prenup is generally to determine how property will be divided should the marriage not survive.  It also takes into consideration things such as spousal support that might be extended and the circumstances surrounding it.

State laws vary quite a bit when it comes to prenups, so it’s really important for Atlanta, Georgia, couples to find an attorney that practices within the state.  Actually, you will want to find two separate lawyers, as each prospective spouse should have his or her own representation.  This is important, not just because it protects each individual’s best interests up front, but because if and when the prenup needs to be upheld, the courts are much more likely to honor it for the same reason.

Not Just for Marriages that End

One mistaken notion that many people have is that prenuptial agreements are only useful if the marriage comes to an end.  What commonly gets overlooked is that it is actually a useful tool in avoiding divorce.  When couples take the time to outline their thoughts about the financial aspects of their upcoming marriage, they are better able to get on the same page about money, fidelity, and other important topics that the marriage lawyers are going to bring up for discussion.

We help lots of prospective brides or grooms in and around Atlanta plan for their futures together with prenuptial agreements. If you’d like our help, please call us at 770-425-6060.

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Understanding the Terminology Your Atlanta Estate Planning Lawyer Uses

Understanding the Terminology Your Atlanta Estate Planning Lawyer Uses

planning definition in dictionary

 

When you walk into an Atlanta estate planning lawyer’s office, you are going to hear some terms that are either completely new to you or that sound like something out of an old movie.  It’s a good idea to have some understanding of these terms ahead of time so you don’t spend time doing anything other than what you hired the attorney to do.   

That said, if you ever have any questions regarding terminology that you were unable to answer on your own, be sure to ask your Atlanta estate planning attorney so you absolutely understand the choices you have and the decisions you’re making.

  • Administration:  This is the term used to refer to the process of settling an estate and includes a number of tasks ranging from doing an inventory of assets to distributing them according to the will or probate court’s instructions.
  • Assets:  Anything owned or controlled by a person that can be used to produce value.  This might include, but is not limited to, real estate, vehicles, investments, life insurance, retirement accounts, and personal property.
  • Beneficiary:  A person named in an insurance policy, retirement account, will, trust or other legal document to receive ownership of the deceased’s assets.
  • Bequest:  A gift designated to go to a particular individual or group, usually designated in a will.
  • Death Tax:  A commonly-used term to refer to taxes imposed by the federal government that must be paid out of an estate.  Also referred to as the Estate Tax.
  • Guardian:  The person appointed to get custody of a minor child and/or the child’s property should the parents be killed or become incapacitated.  (The term “Conservator” is used to refer to those named to provide for others who are not minors.)
  • Heir:  Someone who is entitled to inherit from the deceased.
  • Probate:  The process of closing an estate through the courts that begins with the validation of the will and continues until the assets have been distributed.
  • Trust:  A method for legally holding and managing property for the benefit of another.
  • Will:  A legal document that provides instructions for how a person’s property should be distributed after his or her death.

It’s worth noting that estate planning terms DO change over time.  What may have once been called an “administrator” or “executor” may now be the “personal representative,” for example.  Again, if you have any questions about the terminology being used, don’t hesitate to ask your Atlanta estate planning lawyer for clarification for how terms are used in our state.

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