Residency:

According to Georgia divorce laws, the court does not grant a divorce to any person who has not been living in Georgia for six months before the case is filed. In case the person is a non-resident of the state, the case is dismissed by the divorce court.

Documents Required to File Divorce

Georgia divorce laws require the plaintiff to file a document called a "complaint" with the appropriate Superior Court. This includes information on the marriage like present living arrangements, children of the marriage, assets and debts, and the specific reason claimed for seeking a divorce. A copy of the complaint will be processed on to the other spouse.

Distribution of Property

A Georgia divorce law has not any specific factors on the basis of which marital property is distributed. As Georgia is an equitable state, the property is divided equally i.e. fairly.

Change of Name or Restoration of Name

In all divorce actions, the wife is permissible to restore her previous name.

Mediation Counseling

In Georgia, the court asks for mediation as a final chance provided to either spouse to either reconcile or wait for the court to utterly announce its own decision.

Alimony

The purpose of alimony is not the punishment of a spouse but to provide a sufficient income for the spouse who has become economically dependent on the other. According to Georgia divorce laws either spouse can be awarded alimony. Factors as the standard of living of the couple before the marriage and the length of the marriage are considered before awarding alimony.

Child Custody

According to Georgia divorce laws, child custody is awarded to the parent who has a healthier relationship with the kid. A child has to be given into the proper custody of the parent who really deserves it before the actual divorce is given or obtained.

Child Support

A percentage of the parent’s income who is not awarded the child custody is awarded to assist the support of the children as determined by the “child support guidelines” of the state. The child is to be supported until the age of 18 or when the child is a high school graduates.

SOURCE: AboutDivorce.org